Lean initiative cycle order

Another influential thinker is Kaoru Ishikawa, who is best known for the cause and effect diagram. Also known as the Ishikawa or fishbone diagram, it is a powerful tool that can easily be used to analyse and solve problems. He also played a key role in the development of the Japanese quality strategy, which is characterised by involvement in quality, from the top to the bottom of an organization, as well as from the start to the finish of the product life cycle. This all encompassing quality strategy known as company wide quality control (CWQC) is outlined in Ishikawa’s book “What is Total Quality Control? The Japanese Way”. Ishikawa also understood the importance of top management support, which is a key element in CWQC as well as in six sigma. The bottom-up approach of CWQC is evident in the concept of the quality circle, which is a small group of employees from a work area who voluntarily meet at regular intervals to identify, analyse, and resolve work related problems. Ishikawa was a major influence in the growth in popularity of quality circles. He was the chief executive director of Quality Control Circle headquarters at JUSE and also edited JUSE’s two books on the subject, “QC Circle Koryo” and “How to Operate QC Circle Activities”.

This course provides a deeper understanding of the PMBOK knowledge areas of project integration and procurement applied in the supply chain vendor selection and management process. To keep pace with the continuous moves toward outsourcing of operations and the advancement of technology, companies need to focus on selecting the right suppliers and partnerships to provide the most value to their customers and to remain profitable. This course provides the knowledge, skills, and tools to ensure that you are selecting the right supply chain partners (including 3PL’s) based on your business goals. Emphasis is placed on understanding alternative techniques for supplier selection including applied quantitative decision making techniques.

Caveat:   Blitzes are all too often un-targeted, .  done with little concern as to the overall impact on the total company.   The results of such un-focused blitzes typically have a significant local impact, microcosms of excellence , but little or no impact on overall company well being.   See “Solutions Looking for a Problem” below.

  • Blow-Through BOM’s (Bills of Material):   Many “assembled product” manufacturers need to maintain subassembly identity, and/or control configuration, for replacement parts.   In these circumstances, rather than have a flat bill of material, it is much more practical to continue to show all subassembly levels on the bill of material. A “Blow Through” level, allows the subassembly’s parts to be called out, for kitting or backflush purposes, on the next higher level assembly.   The MRP algorithm “blows through” .  treats the subassembly’s parts as if they were called out on the next higher-level assembly.
  • Boom-Bust Cycle:   Some Causes:   I just got off the phone with a steel finishing plant / distributor.   He said that their on-time delivery performance was terrible, and that their lead times had extended considerably.   When I mentioned some ways to fix this issue, his response was classic:   “The customers have learned to expect it”   “We can’t turn down orders.   We just promise what they want to hear, then beg forgiveness.” And what do the customers do in these situations?   You’ve go it!   They double order.   They order high “just in case”.   They ask for it early, knowing full well that it will be late.

    The lean start-up method is now being taught at more than 25 universities and through a popular online course at . In addition, in almost every city around world, you’ll find organizations like Startup Weekend introducing the lean method to hundreds of prospective entrepreneurs at a time. At such gatherings a roomful of start-up teams can cycle through half a dozen potential product ideas in a matter of hours. Although it sounds incredible to people who haven’t been to one, at these events some businesses are formed on a Friday evening and are generating actual revenue by Sunday afternoon.

    Lean initiative cycle order

    lean initiative cycle order

    The lean start-up method is now being taught at more than 25 universities and through a popular online course at . In addition, in almost every city around world, you’ll find organizations like Startup Weekend introducing the lean method to hundreds of prospective entrepreneurs at a time. At such gatherings a roomful of start-up teams can cycle through half a dozen potential product ideas in a matter of hours. Although it sounds incredible to people who haven’t been to one, at these events some businesses are formed on a Friday evening and are generating actual revenue by Sunday afternoon.

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